Nov 21, 2011

Apple-Salted Caramel Flaky Turnovers


Making these amazing turnovers was two-fold.  Puff pastry was something that I'd been wanting to make for a long time and it's on my 30 While 30 list.  I also bookmarked these turnovers a long, long time ago and then recipe had been staring me down, begging me to make it. :)

The puff pastry was definitely the most time consuming part of the ordeal and while it wasn't too difficult given Annie's amazing photo tutorial, it was messy and involved, two things that I truly don't mind.  I will admit, however, that there was a moment while the dough was chilling and I was cleaning up yet again, that I thought that this puff pastry and all it's work had better be worth it.  I actually thought for a fleeting moment that I might have gone to a bunch of trouble for no reason.  I laugh at myself now over that because this puff pastry was amazingly flaky, flavorful, and beautiful.  It baked up into wonderful layers of buttery goodness in every bite and paired with the apple-salted caramel filling, they definitely didn't last long - as in two days and they were none to be seen.  We ate them for dessert, breakfast, snacks...I mean, apples and pastry are meant to be eaten, right? ;)


Apple-Salted Caramel Flaky Turnovers
Printable Version

For the puff pastry: 
3 cups (15 oz.) unbleached all-purpose flour
1½ tbsp. sugar
1½ tsp. salt
1½ cups (24 tbsp.) cold unsalted butter, cut into ¼-inch cubes
½ cup plus 1 tbsp. ice water
2 tsp. lemon juice

For the filling:
4 large Granny Smith apples (about 2 lbs.)
1½ cups sugar
3 tsp. lemon juice
½ tsp. salt
⅓ cup salted caramel sauce, more or less to taste

For the topping:½ cup sugar
2 tsp. ground cinnamon

1. To make the puff pastry, combine the flour, sugar, and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade and pulse briefly just to combine. Add in about a quarter of the butter cubes and process until the butter is in dime-sized pieces, about four 1-second pulses. Add the remaining butter and process to coat the cubes with flour, about two 1-second pulses. Transfer the mixture to a medium size mixing bowl.
2. In a small bowl, combine the ice water and lemon juice. Add half of the liquid to the flour and butter mixture and toss with your hands just until combined. Keep adding the liquid, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough will clump together with your hand.
3. Turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured work surface. The dough will be dry and shaggy at this point. To fraisage the dough, brace the heel of one hand against the work surface and dragging small portions of the dough forward in short, brisk strokes. Gather the dough together into a rough mound, using a bench scraper if necessary. Repeat the fraisage a second time. Press the dough into an 8x4-inch rectangle and wrap tightly in plastic. Refrigerate for 1 hour.
4. Place the dough onto a lightly floured piece of parchment paper and roll into a 15x10-inch rectangle. Fold the dough lengthwise into thirds, as if you were folding a letter. Starting from the narrow end, loosely roll up the dough into a coil. Press it to form a 6x5-inch rectangle. Repeat the rolling and folding process once more. Roll the dough out into a 15x10-inch rectangle. (If at any point in the rolling and folding process the dough becomes too sticky or difficult to work with, transfer it to a baking sheet or cutting board, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate until it becomes workable.) Fold lengthwise into thirds. Starting from the narrow end, loosely roll up the dough into a coil. Press it to form a 6x5-inch rectangle. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least 1 hour.
5. Roll the dough into a 20x15-inch rectangle, about 1/8-inch thick. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Trim and cut the dough into twelve 5-inch squares and place 6 on each baking sheet. Refrigerate the dough squares while you prepare the filling.
6. To make the filling, peel the apples and grate them on the holes of a large box grater or use a food processor fitted with the shredding dish. Combine the grated apples, sugar, lemon juice, salt, and caramel sauce in a medium bowl. Squeeze out as much of the excess liquid as possible either with your hands or using a potato ricer, place a small amount of filling into the cavity and gently press down until most of the liquid has been removed, continue with remaining filling.
7. Remove one sheet of the dough squares from the refrigerator. Working with one square at a time, place a scant 2 tablespoons of the squeezed apple-salted caramel filling in the center of the dough.
8. Moisten two adjoining edges of the dough square with a finger dipped in the apple liquid or water and fold the top portion of dough over the bottom, making sure to overlap the bottom portion by 1/8-inch. Crimp the edges of the turnover with a fork. Repeat with the remaining dough squares.
9. Return the sheet of turnovers to the fridge and repeat with the second sheet of dough squares. Refrigerate the filled turnovers 30 minutes, or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 24 hours before baking.
10. While the turnovers are chilling, preheat the oven to 375° F. Combine the sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl.
11. Brush or mist the turnovers lightly with water and sprinkle evenly with the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Bake until golden brown, 30-35 minutes, rotating the sheets front to back and top to bottom halfway through the baking time. Carefully transfer the turnovers to a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature.

slightly adapted from Annie's Eats

1 comment:

Erica said...

Good on you for not shying away from a challenge!  They look great. 

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